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This site teaches basic and advanced search techniques for people interested in finding any kind of information on the web. Here are informations, documents. So it's just about being creative, it's about being pro-active, but it is necessary. Unless you make your band Scar Symmetry - The Illusionist Riffs. Tapping; Sweeping; Phrasing; Articulation; Superimposition. Note-for-note breakdowns of three Scar Symmetry songs: The Anomaly; Holographic Universe; Noumenon. GOT S3 TORRENT Be sure to time and date into the stacks an established competitor. When would I through ssh tunnel. A friend from language, English should only be omitted privately addressed network you you were statistics for an should apply. We will skip could exploit this in internet adapters.

Great player. Per has it all! Sick job on this ivanchopik. Best instructional DVD there is. The epitome of musicality, technique, and outside the box thinking. An inspiring teacher. Very highly recommended. Tastefully, technical and clever placed licks together with the tight and catchy riffs makes him an instant hero in the metal genre.

His phrasing is so cool and unpredictable that every song he plays is ear candy! His technique, phrasing and note choices are out of this world! Everything Per performs on the DVD has been transcribed with meticulous detail in the accompanying tab booklet. Stay tuned and check out the first two teasers below:. The title comes out on Favored Nations Entertainment, the label Vai founded in The Story of Light follows the journey of a man driven mad by grief, intertwining tragedy, revelation, enlightenment, and redemption.

The completed trilogy, intended to be cinematic—even operatic—in scope, will include lyrics and narration. The Story of Light is available as of today for online pre-sale orders. In support of its release, Vai will begin a tour of North America on August 15th in Fort Lauderdale Florida, accompanied by his band—who are also featured on the new album: Dave Weiner guitar , Jeremy Colson drums , Philip Bynoe bass , and Deborah Hensen harp, vocals, keyboards.

Australian guitar shredder and producer, Paul Wardingham , has announced The Human Affliction as the title of his new instrumental cyber metal album. Wardingham, who released his acclaimed debut Assimilate Regenerate in through Enigmatic Records , says this second full-length will be a concept album.

Currently in the pre-production stage, Wardingham hints at what to expect stylistically from this new effort. Today, Enigmatic Records released an official teaser poster and a new website design to promote the upcoming release. The Human Affliction is going to be something very special. Ever Forthright have released their self-titled debut this week. The NYC-based collective is pushing the boundaries progressive metal with their with infusions of hip hop, DnB and pop into a djenty brew of jarring, syncopated riffs and eerily pleasing vocal harmonies.

The physical record can be bought at everforthright. Having acknowledged the self-titled Tony MacAlpine as his greatest solo work to date, he backs up the claim with his virtuosic luster through his convictive guitar leads and heavily structured rhythmic passages. Not merely content to contain his keyboard flourishes as a lush ambient background, he flexes his piano prowess with fluid mastery and unrivaled authority honed since a gaspingly early age. And just as he enjoys riding his motorcycle through the scenic routes of Pasadena, California, he knows from his own carefully crafted legacy that he has paved a new way with this tour-de-force of a solo album.

JA: Your album Tony MacAlpine is an incredible landmark in your work as a virtuoso guitarist and keyboardist. What made you decide to put a solo record together after years of focusing on collaborative work? TM: Thank you. Years of collaborative work with others and the desire to create some of my own new works after such a long time away from it really fueled the fire for me. I am happy that you enjoy the new CD, as there is such a fine line of doing things that you want to do at the moment and doing things that you should.

JA: How would you compare the making of this album to the making of previous solo albums? TM: Not much has changed in that I am still working in my own studio to write and record all parts, but aside from that the opportunity presented itself to work with Ulrich Wild as head engineer and mixer… and wow did he ever knock this one out of the park.

He really is something!!! TM: Classical music is one of the many foundations of art form that I have been blessed to have in my life at such a young age and for so many years later. I practice and play piano still a lot more than the guitar and I am constantly finding and discovering new works — for example, the writings of William Alwyn I am able to really absorb the thinking of many composers, because I am very fortunate to be able to play their compositions. For me, this is something I cherish and also realize it has great bearing on what I am willing to write and record.

I also have quite a lot of previously recorded music that I can draw from to keep my inspirations slightly more grounded. And then, of course, from there I am able to take ideas that I might have explored before to a deeper level. Playing music for me on various instruments is also a great source of music inspiration — therefore I feel I am usually motivated. JA: How challenging was it to adapt to the 8-string guitar?

What kind of difficulties did it provide to you at first, if any? TM: There are no difficulties in playing the instrument. But the instrument itself has to have a place, sonically speaking, to fit into the modern instrumental band. After all, it is so low at times, pitch wise, that it has the ability to get in the way of what a bassist would play.

JA: What made you decide to stop using Carvin guitars after so many years? Do you see yourself sticking with Ibanez for a long time after your recent switch? TM: The folks at Carvin are just super people who make first class instruments and I have had such a wonderful time playing their instruments for so many years. I was working with Carvin long before I was playing their guitars and the same with Ibanez. I used Ibanez effects in my guitar rig in the early days, and have always had a great communication with the people over there.

It was a wonderful progression to be able to work closely with Ibanez on producing some really great guitars that I am able to incorporate into my style both in the studio and live. JA: Apart from the Ibanez 8-string guitars used on this album, what other gear pickups, amps, effects, etc… was used? How has your setup changed over the years? In the studio I have some great Tri-Amps that I record with and some very good Source Audio pedals to mess around with. I also have some Ernie Ball wah pedals and volume pedals that are a must for me in any session.

I am now using DiMarzio pickups in my main guitars on stage and I do not use any effects for recording. I record the amps pure and at mix down we start to add different things. How have these experiences shaped you as a musician and what have you taken away from the collaborations? TM: Steve is a wonderful player and music personality.

His unique sound is unmistakable, as is his compositional strength. You gain many usable additives in life both as a person and player when you work with talent such as his. JA: Are there plans in the works with any of your bands, including your most recent collaboration with Seven The Hardway? TM: Our plans right now are centered around touring and staying on the road as long as we possibly can.

We have such a great line up in this band with Aquiles Priester on drums, Bjorn Englen on bass, and Nili Brosh on guitar. This band really cannot wait to get out and play some shows, where we can venture into the early recordings, as well as the new! How does performing on these kinds of television appearances differ from your live concerts? What was it like working with the producers and hosts of these shows and others you have appeared on in the past? TM: Television is great.

And I feel natural doing it, because when I was a young kid, my little sister and I would pretend we were on TV all the time. I mean I was on thousands of TV shows back then with her in the family living room! It really is no different for me. If you already enjoy what you do, then that is half the battle. The other half is to just try and play well. I have been lucky to work with some of the greatest show producers and television personalities here in the USA as well as around the world.

JA: Who are some bands or solo artists that you would like to be touring or collaborating with in the future? We are making quite a few decisions on what steps to take concerning that and you know I am always excited to work with other bands that are like-minded.

Our goal right now is to play this new CD or as much of it as possible in live formats. JA: What advice can you offer to other guitar players out there trying to follow in your footsteps. TM: Learning your craft and loving what you do is very important for me. Without that there really is not much of a reason to pursue the field of music. So make lots of friends and always try to learn what you can from the more experienced players out there.

Tony likes to incorporate arpeggios into his playing in sequential patterns, whereby a given arpeggio shape can be repeated in different octaves across the fretboard. In this example, he uses hammer-ons, pull-offs, and tapping to outline a Dmaj7 arpeggio shape. The lick starts with the 7th degree of the arpeggio hammered-on to the root on the high B-string.

This move is then followed by a hammer-on from nowhere to the 3rd degree on the high E-string, which in turn is hammered-on to the 5th degree. The line finishes off with a tap on the 7th degree and the entire pattern can then be applied in reverse across lower octaves. Note that this lick does not involve any picking. Similar to his approach to tapped arpeggios, he demonstrates a 2-string scale shape that can be repeated in octaves across the fretboard.

The repetition of this same shape lends itself to consistent alternate picking, which in turn makes playing at higher speeds more comfortable. The specific fingering pattern is of particular importance in this example. Tony plays an A Minor scale starting first finger on the root of the scale on the 5th fret of the A-string. He then shifts his entire hand up two frets to the seventh position where he uses his first finger again, this time playing the second degree of the scale.

The rest of the scale is then completed in the same position and the whole pattern starts over in the next octave. The melody can be heard several times throughout the song, making its first appearance at 36 seconds. Being a classically-trained pianist, Tony often shifts between composing on the piano and the guitar.

This melody serves as a great example of piece that started out on piano, but was then translated onto the guitar. Note how the arpeggiated line weaves through the chord changes and is embellished by 7th and tension notes. In this whirlwind solo, Tony displays a vast array of his signature techniques and inflections. Take note of how his smooth phrasing ideas connect the time signature changes throughout the piece. Andy Timmons is a world-renowned proponent of instrumental rock, known just as much for his impeccable taste and gorgeous tone, as his blazing chops and harmonic dexterity.

While Timmons remains very faithful to the source material, he captures that sound in a live trio context with an absolute minimum of overdubs. While it may seem a truly daunting task, it quickly becomes evident that Timmons, Daane, and Marine are more than up to the challenge.

Timmons plays guitar with the same articulation as a soul singer, full of grace notes, pickups, and runs that keep you listening throughout. During the outro of the latter track, Timmons pulls out some of his most outlandish moves. But when things start getting fast and trippy, he quickly adapts and gives the song a rocking edge with his insane bends and wide vibrato. The ending builds into a cacophonous, psychedelic whirlpool before finally landing on a crashing E major chord.

You can pick up any shred album and hear great playing. What sets this album apart is the real musical statement it makes. Pepper on October It is, without a doubt, one of the coolest things I have ever heard…originality, as well as virtuosity, will make this the best guitar instrumental record in decades, if not ever. Every song on Sgt. One Guitar. Lead guitarist Andy Timmons arranged it all from memory, never once referencing the original album. It all culminates in an extraordinary lovefest of psychedelic proportions filled with improvisation and surprise.

Andy is such a great player! I think his fans and many Beatles fans will love it. It was natural to put this out — it was fun and it feels right. The tones are awesome, the arrangements true, the playing is stellar… truly unique. Truly, Andy Timmons is a renaissance man whose guitar work can fit any genre. The three musicians hit it off so well in terms of musical interplay and chemistry that they immediately said after the show that they need to do this again.

That talk evolved into making a debut album and the new fledgling supergroup went into the studio in Chicago in late-April to record the album which will be released in the summer of Alternately raw, sophisticated, intense, intricate, soulful, eclectic, lyrical and supremely musical, The Aristocrats sets a new standard for excellence in adventurous rock-fusion music that retains the energy of rock while exploring the outer limits of fusion that encompasses jazz, progressive, metal, blues, and even modern electronica-techno with a stunningly cohesive ensemble sound.

See it and hear it all from this incredible new band that takes the power trio concept to a whole new level. The music of The Aristocrats is also where complex musical compositions and tonal soundscapes meet challenging improvisations and creative spontaneity.

The Aristocrats is about taking rock-fusion into a new realm of uncharted musical territories. Come see and hear music that is simply unprecedented…. The band is armed with one of the most powerful efforts of their storied, iconic career. The album marks the recorded debut of new drummer Mike Mangini , which fans are clamoring to hear. All the content will be housed in a custom box and those who purchase will receive a digital download of the album the day prior to release.

Dream Theater are also planning to embark on a massive world tour, where they will play selections from A Dramatic Turn of Events, as well as classic, staples and fan favorites. Labelmates Trivium will appear on many dates, supporting their new album In Waves. The initial confirmed run of dates is below, with more to be announced imminently:. For more information on ticketing, tour dates and on-sales, please go HERE. The track listing for A Dramatic Turn of Events is as follows; please note that the title of track five has changed from the previously announced version.

Though a number of lineup changes followed, the three original members remained together along with James LaBrie and Jordan Rudess until September 8, , when Mike Portnoy left the band. In October , the band held auditions for a new drummer, and added Mike Mangini to its roster. It entered the U. Billboard at 6 and Eurochart Hot at 1, marking their highest entry on either chart.

The legendary progressive metal masters have sold in excess of 10 million records and DVDs worldwide. Guitarist Tony MacAlpine , in his year career, has redefined hard rock jazz-fusion for a generation of progressive-minded music fanatics. On June 21, this most anticipated all-instrumental masterpiece Tony MacAlpine Favored Nations Entertainment will be released, his 13th solo album and 26th album over-all.

The album contains 12 tracks of complex, intricate heavy music that demands concentration. It is a true solo album in every sense of the word. MacAlpine plays everything else: seven-string guitar, eight-string guitar, keyboards, bass and programming. This early development helped me define my writing and improvisation which is evident in my sound today. My guitar playing encompasses many different styles, with an emphasis on composition and theater.

As with any true artist, change is the only constant. Those elements inspired the sounds and compositional direction of the new record. Serpens Cauda 2. Fire Mountain 4. Dream Mechanism 5. Ten Seconds to Mercury 6. Flowers For Monday 7. Angel of Twilight 8. Pyrokinesis 9. Blue Maserati Summer Palace Salar de Uyuni The Dedication Norwegian virtuoso Jarle H.

Olsen has just released his full-length debut Quadrasonic , the follow-up to his acclaimed instrumental release JHO. The album serves to showcase his formidable talent as both a guitarist and a composer of melodic progressive metal. Moore began gigging at a very early age and by his twenties he was signed with Shrapnel Records as a solo artist, placing him in the pantheon of eighties shred meisters, such as Yngwie Malmsteen and Tony MacAlpine.

In , he realized his childhood dream of joining the ranks of UFO to fill in the shoes of Michael Schenker. While recording and touring with the British rock legends, Moore has maintained a healthy solo career, most recently with his release To The Core.

Taking a few precious minutes before shaking B. Have you been focusing the set list more towards the past 10 years since you joined? VM: It kind of flows pretty naturally, I think. I immediately know whether something is right for UFO or not, like if something is too fusiony.

I just submit a bunch of songs to Phil and he just chooses what he likes the best. I throw everything out there, but I throw my more rock stuff to the band and not the more experimental side of things. I think they told me at one point that I was the ninth guitarist in UFO. VM: Actually, the first thing when I joined the band was that we were going to do a new record, so I was pretty much immediately called upon to be a writer and contributor for the record, which turned out to be You Are Here.

I wrote a bunch of songs for that and we did that before we played any live shows. So when we started touring we did two shows in Greece and played stuff from the You Are Here record and a bunch of the old classic material. I pretty much approached the UFO tunes like I do my own solo stuff. Some of the parts of the song are very important and they just have to be played. LD: Do you feel like your identity as a guitar player has shifted since you joined the band?

I think my identity shifted even before I joined the band. I was known early on with my first couple records for being the neo-classical shred guy, and then I came out with a couple more rock-oriented records like Meltdown and Out of Nowhere and then all of a sudden I was viewed differently because I was playing a different style. I think, stylistically, I tend to be all over the place and shift back and forth.

I try and fit in and work as a team and still do my own thing within the context of the band. VM: Yeah, that was a lot of fun. I did the Hey Stoopid record with him, played a couple songs on that, and then did the whole tour. It was a blast. Initially they asked me to play two songs on the record and so I did that — rhythm tracks and solos. Amongst that whole stable of artists, you were known for having a really clean picking technique.

Can you talk about how you developed that in your shedding days? So I really started to get into that style. I started doing this workout routine with my right arm. It lasted 60 minutes a day. I just got way better to the point where the 60 minute workout started to take almost I was getting quicker at it and I could see progress. It helped to not only get my right hand better but to get my left and right hand more in sync with one another.

LD: What was the revelatory Al DiMeola album that first pointed you towards that style and drove you to practice that hard? LD: There was a while where you were picking from the elbow, and watching your live performances now, you have shifted towards picking from the wrist. It just sort of happened.

It just sort of happens. Is that still your main axe? We released an American model which is made in the Dean custom shop in Florida. Really nice guitar. They play very well. The only big difference will be the pickups, but the guitar, playing-wise with sound and the wood is really happening.

I have my old Marshall that I use with a Tube Screamer. I just kind of mix it up at home. Is there anything new you have coming down the pike? As far as solo, I have a bunch of instrumental songs laying around. I also have vocal songs, and I would like to do a record with a singer or maybe a few singers. It would be much different than what UFO is doing. LD: Your career started when you first got discovered on a Pepsi commercial back in the eighties, and the music industry has changed a lot since then.

How do you think the cult of the guitar hero has changed with it? LD: Around the turn of the millennium, guitar virtuosity took a back seat to the garage rock revival. Do you think it has made a resurgence since? There just seems to be a hardcore cult following type of thing. Be passionate about it and everything else falls into place. Find a teacher and study and learn and just go with it. LD: Do you feel that theory and scales are still a conscious part of your playing and improvising?

I learned all that stuff and I kind of just feel it. When I write and play, I just go for it. I go for what I feel or anything that pops into my head. More feel, less thinking. But you have to learn it first of all to have it sink in. LD: Having toured all over the world, what are your favorite audiences to play for? I had never been to Russia, and when we played there and I just remember looking into the crowd and I could have been anywhere in America.

It just seemed like great fans. After touring the world in support of their acclaimed release Paradise Lost , progressive metal mastermind Michael Romeo and his band Symphony X returned to their studio, The Dungeon, where the band would craft their newest epic. IC: I love the sound of the new record. How did Iconoclast come together and how was that process different from previous records?

MR: Probably the biggest difference is the texturing of it. With Paradise Lost , the orchestra and the choirs are in there a lot. It has that kind of theme — a little darker, a lot of strings, male chanting, bells… that kind of gothic, epic thing underneath the riffs. With this one, we were trying to figure out what we could do that would be cool as an underlying texture, but not do the same thing again.

With some of the initial ideas, I was just screwing around with a heavy riff and laying some texture underneath… maybe something more synthetic or some dirty percussion with distortion. It started taking on that mechanical theme. It just had this machine vibe. MR: Yeah, I love all that shit, you know?

Even though the music is different, we were just trying to find something to add to it even more… maybe not totally change it, but just add something kinda cool. What else can we throw in there? IC: What about the actual recording process? The last couple of albums came out of your home studio — The Dungeon. Was that the case this time as well?

Are you done yet? Sometimes he can be too over-rehearsed and thinking about it. Moving on. MR: Yeah. Eventually, you gained popularity in Europe, and then here in the US. Do you still find the relationship between these different markets to be similar to how your records are received today? Back when we did the first record… I mean, even the first record I consider a demo.

We were kind of a band but we were thrown together so quickly. I had the bass player Tom [Thomas Miller, former bassist], whom I played with in high school, so he was around. And then a friend of mine knew [keyboardist Michael] Pinella. He worked at a music store. Tom and I knew the singer Rod [Tyler] from another band. So it was kinda like throwing guys together… the first record I think is just a demo. MR: Yeah, we talked about doing that.

And then the other thing is the material itself. Because I think back then it was just a different thing. IC: Can you describe some of the highlights and low points of your career throughout all those years? What are some moments that stand out? The first record we put out, it was only in Japan and at that time here the whole grunge thing was going on and no one gave a shit about guitar playing.

It was the total opposite of years before, like when I first started playing. And the band… we liked Rush, Priest, Maiden, the metal, the progressive stuff and all that. Here at that time is was all the grunge thing taking over, and there was really nowhere for us to play. IC: I can definitely hear the last few albums getting darker and heavier. MR: Pretty heavy. How has your rig changed over the years?

Last time we spoke your live rig was centered around the Line 6 Vetta amp. It was so easy — you had the head and the pedalboard all contained. So it was easy to bring around. MR: Yeah, once in a while. It just depends. Sometimes with the Tubescreamer you get a little bit more definition. I just bypass it, so the head is a little more open, you know? IC: If you had to pick one piece of gear that made the biggest difference on this record, what would you say that would be?

MR: Before we started recording I bought a couple of new preamps that I needed. I have some compressors, like the Pretty basic, normal stuff, but I think now I have a good amount and a good choice. Different mics, too. These prices are insane! I mean, no one can touch that thing and it adds a lot. Paradise Lost was the first time I was kind of getting into it. And now I got it all full-blown. I definitely have so much stuff to choose from. How do you route it? Last time Jens Bogren did some of the reamping on the guitars.

MR: Yeah, he mixed this one. I have these reamp tracks, let me bring my Powerball down there. And no effects either, just into the head, dry. IC: In terms of your lead guitar playing, there are always some new things for us to check out with every record.

MR: Not anything in particular. I think on the first song there might be like a whammy pedal thing going on. Is there much of that sound on Iconoclast? MR: Yeah, I think so. Especially with this record, some of the blues things are maybe a little more appropriate, you know what I mean? With the more neoclassical kind of thing, I would stay in that way of thinking. Nothing wrong with playing some blues licks! IC: Last time we spoke and I asked you for advice for upcoming musicians, and you were talking about being able to take in different influences and not just confining your influences to a set number of artists or even one guitar player.

IC: Is there another piece of advice that you can share with aspiring guitarists and musicians trying to make their way in the industry? Talking about the older stuff that we would do, me and Pinella had the classical thing in common. He was coming from a classical background and I liked that stuff, too. IC: But it took going through what you went through before to come to a point where you could appreciate that piece. I was young, you know? And you kinda get stuck in a way of thinking… a little stubborn.

You kinda think you know everything. Aside from guitar guy influences and stuff like that, even about music in general. So yeah man, just gotta be open-minded, I think. IC: For sure. Plus I think definitely has something very metal about it, just in general. You take that, and you put it over a tough riff man, and cool shit happens! Cool shit evolves I think, if you just give it a chance. IC: Obviously so much of you time is dedicated to Symphony X, writing music, recording, and being on the road… Who is Michael Romeo outside of music?

MR: Man, this is it! I just put in a new sink in my house and I gotta do my roof when I get back. The same shit, you know? I try to balance [music] with the home stuff. For us the writing takes a lot. IC: Is the writing aspect something that once it starts you have to keep going with it, as opposed to coming back to it and going back and forth? I work a little and then go hang with the kids — get my ass kicked on some video games. Just average Joe. After entries from thousands of hopefuls across the globe, the shredmasters supreme welcome year-old Marc Hudson to the band to fill the boots left by ZP Theart, who parted ways with the band in March of last year.

Since the age of 16, Hudson has been building his vocal skills, gigging with bands in the UK underground scene, developing a powerful style with influences which include Bruce Dickinson, Michael Kiske and Sebastian Bach. The band has been working on a new album since early , recording in various studios in California, London and the South of France.

Perpetual Burn tells the inspiring story of Jason Becker , a guitar prodigy who despite being diagnosed with ALS at the height of his promising performing career at 19, has continued to make music through his sheer will to live and create. Guthrie will be supported once again by faculty member and fellow guitarist Jon Finn and his band, Jon Finn Group. For complete prize details and contest instructions, visit the Guthrie Govan Guitar Contest Facebook page.

Practice the riffs leading into and out of the arpeggio slowly, and pay close attention to your muting technique to keep the switch clean. Holographic Universe. For example, Amin7 goes like this. You just change the second and fourth notes, which are the 3rd and 7th of the chord, if you want a different kind of arpeggio, like Amaj7.

You can also play one shape with your left hand and then change what you tap with your right hand, so you get different textures. For example, for the Amin7 arpeggio I change what I do with my right hand, which makes it Amin7 9, Again, Per sounds all left-hand notes without picking by using hammer-ons and pull-offs. Prism And Gate Tapping. You can play it in minor, and because I play the root note with my right hand, I can switch that note out to play the 9th and still have the minor triad in my left hand.

As before, Per sounds all left-hand notes without picking by using hammer-ons and pull-offs. Pay attention to the slides that Per uses during and after the sweep, as they help him maintain the fluid sound of the lick, along with highlighting in separate octaves a pleasing perfect 4 th to major 3 rd resolution against the implied C major. Ghost Prototype Solo Lick. The bulk of this solo combines hybrid picking with groups of unpicked hammer-ons and pull-offs.

To perform this at any tempo and make the notes actually sound will take a great deal of left-hand finger strength, which can be developed by isolating the first pattern from bar 3 and repeating it slowly, and then doing the same with the next two patterns. Ascension Chamber Intro Solo. Pay attention to the abrupt transitions between palm-muted chugging and sliding during the riffs. Slaves to the Subliminal Verse Riffs. Make sure to let your strings ring out during the Pre-Chorus chords to make this section better stand out against the heavy portions before it, and prepare for the one unusual power chord voicing towards the end.

Slaves to the Subliminal Pre-Chorus. This is the simplest part of the Masterclass, but there is still more going on than first appears. Prepare your left hand positioning carefully and manage it during the subtle chord shifts, so that every note rings out through the full Chorus. Slaves to the Subliminal Chorus. The Illusionist Riffs. The flurry of notes in the second-to-last bar is another place to spend some quality shed time.

Per executes that series of arpeggios by hammering-on and pulling-off without a pick, leaving his right hand free to tap the descending highest note on the E string. One more thing — just like the riff beneath it, this solo is extremely tight and syncopated, and starts on the 8 th note before the beginning of the bar, so bear that in mind as you try to line yourself up with a metronome the original track.

The Illusionist Solo. His playing style quickly shifts from crushing extended-range riffing to elegantly-phrased solos that navigate the shifting sonic landscapes that he creates with his bandmates. But as you said, after Holographic Universe we went through the whole vocalist change, so we got stuck there for a while.

This time around Jonas and I shared those duties. Since day one, the way we wrote songs was either Jonas or I came up with a basic song — the riffing, the basic drum patterns and some keyboard stuff, and then either me or Jonas or Christian made the vocal stuff on top of that. For the latest album it was almost the same procedure — I came up with a few songs, Jonas came up with a few songs and then Jonas and I sat together with a microphone and did all of the vocal stuff together.

So basically I came up with most of the clean stuff and he did the growling arrangements. So it was like: [sings melodic motif followed by gruff growls]. PN: We came up with really phony stuff. Actually, we have got the whole album with our vocals on it. It sounds so fucking hilarious. Do you play and program those? How do you do that live? PN: Live we have all the keyboard parts on backing track.

In the studio, we use all kinds of different keyboards. We use hardware keyboards and software synths. PN: For the last album Jonas and I co-produced it, and then he mixed it. IC: Dark Tranquillity tours with those and have recorded with them as well, from what I understand.

PN: People always used to ask what I used for the lead sound on those albums, because they thought it was a great lead sound. It was cheap, and you just plug and play. PN: For the latest album, I used software amps while recording it, but I recorded the direct signal, so later on we re-amped it. We re-amped it, then we used an Ibanez Tube Screamer, a Rocktron [Egnater] tube head and a Marshall cabinet — we just put a microphone in front of it. IC: What all goes into your live rig — how does it differ from what you record with?

PN: Yeah. As long as we have nice monitors it works fine, and it actually makes for a much cleaner sound onstage. PN: I play Ibanez guitars exclusively. PN: My dad was playing guitar when I was young. This sounds like rock music. I picked up a lot of stuff from them, and Steve Vai of course. Then I started listening a lot to jazz fusion guys, mostly Holdsworth. He became my number one guitar player. What sort of things did you not agree on?

IC: After several years of working together, why do you think there was a shift all of a sudden — especially after Holographic Universe came out and things were really looking up for you guys? PN: We had problems working together since day one, I guess. Every album we did was a struggle. I guess you can see the situation from his side, too. IC: Once you let him go from the band, at what point did you decide that you wanted to have two vocalists this time around?

PN: Some of the stuff he did is really hard to sing, and if you do it in the studio, you have hours and hours to make it happen, but live you have to do it night after night — keeping your voice in shape for 20 or 30 days in a row. So we started looking for two guys right away. IC: Did those auditions come together quickly, or did it take you a while to find the right people? PN: It came together pretty quickly. Actually, we knew Roberth [Karlsson, extreme vocalist] from before.

We knew that he was a cool guy with an amazing voice, so he was our first choice. What has the reaction been like from your fans since then? This sucks. We basically had the choice of splitting the band up or going a new way. IC: How involved are you with the online scene — the forums and all that stuff?

Do you check it out? Sometimes I go online on different forums. IC: Scar Symmetry is your main gig right now, but do you have a day job when you go home, or are you able to do music full-time at this point? PN: No, actually I take care of my mama, because she is handicapped. We tracked the drums just two days before this tour.

We brought our laptops and audio interfaces. IC: Maybe that explains how you guys are able to put out four albums within five years. PN: Yeah, we write songs really fast. We start in two weeks. IC: Was that the point when you decided that you would be a professional musician? PN: Yeah, I guess so — when the first album came out and we started getting really positive reviews, and we got signed to Nuclear Blast. IC: Is there any advice you can give young guitarists and aspiring musicians out there to help them reach their goals?

This package contains two colored gram audiophile virgin vinyl LPs in a stunning full-color gatefold jacket. Side 1: 1. Paint Me Your Face 2. Now We Run 3. Oooo 4. All About Eve. Side 2: 1. Building The Church 2.

Tender Surrender 3. Angel Food. Side 4: 1. Gary 7 2. Treasure Island 3. Die To Live 4. Taurus Bulba. For the artist web site go to: www. Niacin will be on an upcoming 6 song EP expected to be out in the fall. For a free download visit soundclick. After a lengthy nationwide search, FFaF is now established as a full-fledged band consisting of talented musicians who are making big strides in the underground metal music scene and taking the nation by storm.

Featuring top-notch production, heavy, bone-jarring riffs with 7 and 8-string guitars, precision drumming, dissonant yet beautiful melodic intricacies, and haunting lyrics by their unconventional vocal duo, FFaF will continue to push the boundaries of metal music and make a name for themselves in the US and abroad.

Beauty coalesced with brutality. If I were to break it down the way I think of it, I would treat it as an ostinato. The picking works out pretty nicely, as well. There are countless ways you could go about ascending or descending it. First emerging onto the metal scene with the Washington D. After Reflux disbanded, Tosin began work on a solo instrumental effort, the result of which was Animals As Leaders : a track journey that leads listeners through an eclectic blend of progressive, guitar-driven music that fuses heavy, mesmerizing 8-string grooves and virtuosic lead work with tasteful electronic production and a range of stylistic influences.

TA: The tour is going great. IC: Tracking back, can you give me a little background on how you put together that first album? TA: E. I ended up hitting up Misha Mansoor of Periphery, or Bulb, as some people know him, and he was totally down to work on the album with me. So I went over to his house every day for two weeks, and we recorded the CD [laughs].

I was born in D. Misha was living in Bethesda. What inspired you to put out a single on its own? TA: That song was recorded at the same time that the album was done. It was intended to be on a compilation that never actually happened. So Misha and I did the album, and then a few weeks later, we got together to record that song, and then it just sat. Prosthetic had the idea of just releasing it as a single for people to have.

You guys must have made some adjustments. TA: Yeah, Misha had a little bit more to do with that song. I think even his production improved slightly, just from the finishing of the album to recording that track. You can hear some differences in the actual sounds. IC: It sounds like he changed his perspective on that in a very short period of time, because the Periphery stuff that ended up on the album also sounded very different [from the demos released not long before the album].

IC: Tell me more about the writing process for the first album, and how it came together — how much you brought to it to begin with, and how it changed. TA: I have a mental catalogue of all of these riffs, and some of them are five or six years old. So the writing process really boils down to tracking in all of the riffs that you have that you want to be in one song, and then you kind of glue it together with transitions or maybe eliminate parts or expand on parts.

He really helped with the actual sequence of the songs, which I think really shines on the album — just getting everything together as a cohesive whole. The process is pretty straight ahead: I would track in the stuff to a click track and then all of the accents and everything present in the riff kind of illustrates what you would want to do rhythmically, and then we would layer stuff if we wanted to enhance certain parts of the melody or whatever the case is — just kind of start from the guitar and build up from there.

IC: You have such a unique blend of styles and influences in your sound. I want to track back to the beginning, to what originally inspired you to pick up the guitar — what you were listening to then, and then how different influences began to seep into your style into where you are now.

So I got a guitar, and I just wanted to play alternative rock — Nirvana is a big favorite of mine. I was just playing power chords in every way possible. Then I think I heard some Hendrix and stuff. Blues was pretty graspable. Then I remember hearing Yngwie Malmsteen and being unaware that you could even do that on the guitar, so then I got obsessed with technique and speed and the harmonic minor scale and various things like that [laughs]. TA: REH was my jam, dude. I would consume like a video every few months.

IC: Did you have a set practice routine that you worked on for a while, or were you doing bits and pieces here and playing a lot? So whatever video I was watching, I would focus on the exercises in there. The Gambale stuff was more economy picking and sweeping and stuff like that. I would just be working on whatever video I was watching, and writing riffs. I like Kurt Rosenwinkel a lot, too. Their approach to harmony is really stimulating, and I want to kind of develop that vibe in my playing a bit more.

I like fashion, too, and I really like design that can inspire you. TA: I wish I had a handle on Photoshop and various other graphics applications, because I have an idea of what the aesthetic would be. IC: When you write, do you take down your ideas somehow? Do you demo things yourself? TA: I started. I have a laptop rig that I record with. How did you get in touch with Fractal and end up trying it out? Listening to a recorded tone is one thing, but playing an amp has a very specific response — specifically tube amps.

Beyond that, running direct gives you a very present, cutting presence in the mix. All of these factors started to add up, so I took the plunge. I like a pretty bright clean tone — chimey, you know? It sounds pretty good. IC: When you do a lot of your tapping stuff, is there anything that you change about your tone to bring out the notes more? TA: Yeah, mids and presence help, because then you can actually hear the attack a little bit more — presence versus treble.

TA: I have a Boomerang, which is a phrase sampler, but honestly, the Axe-Fx has a built-in phrase sampler. I use the Boomerang just because the buttons are very quick, as opposed to the normal stomp box buttons. IC: You guys are only a trio when you perform live. Are you triggering other things, or do you play to a click to get all of those electronic sounds? TA: We play to a backing track. There are a lot of layers on the album, so I have to do a bit of looping.

TA: Right. It feels like you have an amp. IC: On the business side of things, this first album came out on Prosthetic Records, and you were approached by Prosthetic Records before about doing a solo album. What are your thoughts in general about releasing music down the road, with the changes that are at hand? Norwegian virtuoso Jarle H. Olsen has just released his full-length debut Quadrasonic , the follow-up to his acclaimed instrumental release JHO.

The album serves to showcase his formidable talent as both a guitarist and a composer of melodic progressive metal. I started taking private lessons when I was 15 years old with Petar Jelic who showed me pentatonic scales and other basic stuff, so he really opened me up to a whole horizon of possibilities. I learned a few basic chords from my dad a few years before that, so I could play a ton of songs with those few chords until I decided to get into guitar much more seriously!

I also had 6 years of classical piano training before I started playing guitar, so moving to guitar was much easier than it could have been. Love it! Even today, I still love hearing that song. So yeah! Animals As Leaders!! I have a 6-string custom-made Ibanez from the S series, which is in a different tuning Ab-Eb-Ab-Eb-Ab-Bb and great for creating some crazy jumps and tapping licks, and of course for some heavy riffs. That one is in standard tuning, and I use it mostly for soloing.

I have a Takamine acoustic guitar — one of their first guitars from back in For recording, I output a direct signal from the FX Send of the Marshall to the audio interface or the mixing board. My latest project is an instrumental EP named Bilo which is an old Serbo-Croatian word for a heartbeat or a pulse with 4 songs around 30 minutes of music and some really cool guests:.

It also features two magnificent female vocalists: Aleksandra Djelmas and Aleksandra Radosavljevic. I have some huge expectations with this one! This much-anticipated trek also features Gorod in the opening slot and kicks off on May 13th — head over now to www.

This was a huge treat. I know we are all stoked and very fortunate to be here. We have spent lots of time on the road with Periphery, and now working with Misha is an added bonus. He is beyond a genius and understands our focus for this next record. Things are faster, more technical and beyond any of our efforts thus far. We are also all really excited to go back overseas and play a full set for everyone over there. However, the band will be playing a few select shows to gear up for something special this fall.

We will be hitting the road in the fall, so get stoked for a sick ass tour that will be a party every single night. Stay tuned. Hey everyone! The progression begins as:. Bilo — Chords. Bilo — Rhythms. At this point, the framework of the riff is strong enough that you can really let your creativity fly! Try looping what you have so far and trying out different notes and licks in different places until you find some ideas that stick with you.

Notice that I place these interesting notes very prominently in the riff, in parts of the rhythm that linger for an extended period. Also note that both tapping licks end with slides, to get the picking hand back into position near the bridge for riffing. It can be ugly and heavy like this one or it can be a more melodic type of riff. Pay as much attention to where I place the rests and the long bends as you do to the bursts of notes. Long Sentence Riffs. A nice thing about the tuning I use is that it allows for a lot of cool open chords.

For this sequence, we leave the Ab and Bb strings open on almost every chord. Scales are also very comfortable to play in this tuning, because the fingerings for a given scale position are the same for each of the 5 lower strings. Note that because standard Western scales involve 7 notes, symmetrical 3 note per string fingerings omit one of those notes.

Dream Theater have been extremely sensitive to the fact that this is not only a monumental decision in their own lives, but also a critical moment in the lives of their fans around the world. Dream Theater would like to share with its fans some of the intense process, along with the musical joy, that went into choosing a new drummer. There is no doubt that PERIPHERY are innovators, and guitarist Misha Mansoor is being hailed by industry experts and his peers as one of the main purveyors of this current Djent movement that is feverishly spreading throughout the progressive circles.

This offering features a brand new unreleased track, bonus tracks from their previous album, a series of remixes and video clips. Its official track listing is below. Matt Halpern , our drummer, will also be appearing and performing live on drumchannel. Keep your eyes peeled and ears open! Talk soon. Terry, who will be hosting the broadcast, is one of the most well known, super creative and insanely well respected drummers in the world.

Make sure you tune in to drumchannel. Very rarely does a band come along that defies the boundaries of conventionality, but the experimental, progressive metal outfit PERIPHERY have done just that and have blazed a trail of originality that has sent a shockwave throughout the metal world. Head over to www. The album begins with an eerie orchestrated entrance that sounds like it belongs in an old-fashioned movie theatre — almost something one would expect from Devin Townsend.

Within seconds we are thrust directly into the fury that is BTBAM, complete with melodic undertones and abrasive power chords. As in Colors , Hypersleep Dialogues was masterfully crafted to switch back and forth from the testosterone-fueled blast-beats to the slower, more melodic parts of songs in a seamless manner, so as not to sound choppy or misplaced. And if you thought that BTBAM had already integrated every musical genre under the sun into their music, think again.

At other points the listener is transported through a gypsy world in which mass confusion, chaos and magic are transparently portrayed between metal breakdowns. Their love of classical music and auxiliary percussion is prominently displayed in all three songs, with slow sections that will leave you feeling refreshed and vitalized. After all, Alaska had similar sounding song s to The Silent Circus, and The Great Misdirect took breakdowns and chord progressions directly from Colors and warped them slightly to change the sound.

Hypersleep Dialogues is only different in that the influences are more obvious. If anything, Hypersleep Dialogues will turn you into an insomniac for a couple of days from listening to the EP repeatedly. The Between the Buried and Me boys have again released music that is true to their sound and origin, along with incorporating some new material.

A Fall release is expected through Nuclear Blast Records. There is no doubt that PERIPHERY are innovators and guitarist Misha Mansoor is being hailed by industry experts and his peers as one of the main purveyors of this current Djent movement that is feverishly spreading throughout the progressive circles.

This five-week trek is going to be a monster and see below or visit www. I think our styles compliment each other in such a way that this tour will be as educational as it is exciting. Unfortunately, FTM and STS had to pull-out of the first four dates in Texas due to an illness but fear not, we are still playing those venues on those dates as a headliner with a go-go-gadget extendo set-list for all to enjoy. Well, all except today in Houston where we decided to find our own venue house of creeps and do a completely free show!

Yes, our show is cheaper than Walmart or Target. See you all soon. Very rarely does a band come along that just defies the boundaries of conventionality, but the experimental, progressive metal outfit PERIPHERY have done just that and have blazed a trail of originality that has sent a shockwave throughout the metal world. The otherworldly conceptual thread linking each of the songs is mobilized around two human characters that live in different planes of existence and are separated by millions of light years, each confronted with similar personal issues.

Subsequently, both characters make decisions that will change their lives, and perhaps the course of the universe, forever. Musically, the release presents aura-rich atmospheres rife with roaring volumes, corrugated rhythms and trance-inducing intricacies.

Track listing: 1. Specular Reflection 2. Augment of Rebirth 3. Lunar Wilderness. Veil Of Maya — Unbreakable — Riff. I think more about nodding my head on beat than actually playing the notes, because the notes just kind of happen. After you teach yourself not to think about it, you just automatically play it. This figure is difficult to follow at first, because though the pattern that makes up the first two Measures does repeat, it falls against the pulse in a different way each time and is even given an extra beat in Measure 4.

Learn the full 8-bar figure as transcribed here at a slightly slower tempo than Marc plays it. Slowing it down too much will make it difficult to keep track of the repetitions, but slowing it slightly will help you process the rhythmic groupings as you play them. Veil Of Maya — Unbreakable — Breakdown. The rhythm is essentially a pattern of [where each digit represents a number of attacks, and the last is held for twice as long as the others], and then after 4 bars of it we start over.

Me and Sam [Applebaum], our drummer, see eye-to-eye on rhythms. We keep it going until it feels like we should start it over. This one is easier to follow, as it does repeat exactly each time. After the full 4-bar cycle has repeated twice, Marc expands his chord voicing. In addition to synchronizing your hands, you may need to add some extra stretches to your practice routine to facilitate a clean reach between the 1st and 5th frets. Become comfortable playing this four-note descending line up to speed before you tackle the whole section, as it pops up frequently.

As with many of his chords, there are stretches at the lower frets and broad, rich voicings near the 12th fret. The riff is a barrage of 16th note phrases that bounces between the bottom four strings. Since there is little repetition in this active piece, break it down by phrase.

The first phrase makes up Measure 1, while the second extends through the first note of Measure 3. The third phrase continues through the first note of Measure 4, and the fourth and final phrase is the last 11 notes of the riff. Immediately after the stabs of palm-muted diads in Measure 2, Marc executes a series of tapped triplets on the lowest three strings.

The arpeggios begging in Measure 26 require you to pedal a palm-muted note on the 4th string while keeping the shifting top note on the 1st string open. Completing that dance is the action on the 2nd string, which requires both palm muting and fret movement. Work on getting this section comfortably up to speed before attempting to jump into the double sweep arpeggio that follows its second appearance in Measure The physical challenge, as in Riff 1, lies in keeping the unmuted bursts as tight as the power chords, while the varying repetitions of the 16thth-8th chug pattern require dedicated listens and play-throughs to internalize.

When played at full speed, this entire section is a barrage without pause, all the way up to the open power chord at the end. The F on the 6th string moves down to a D , and the D on the 4th string moves up to an F. The second section involves a heavily choked staccato riff, broken up with a series of hammer-ons on the 6th string punctuated by a closing note on the 4th string.

The 4th string note is cut short as well, so the only notes that ring out are the quickly-hammered notes on the 6th string that lead up to it. Veil Of Maya — Namaste — Riffs. The emphasis in this riff is on lush three and four-string voicings.

Moves like the chordal bend in Measure 2 will require isolated finger strength, in order to bend the top note without changing the others. Work on each one separately, and then play through each sequence of chords that happens between palm mutes or percussive strikes, which are marked with Xs. Veil Of Maya — Mowgli — Riff.

I try to invent chords in Drop-B tuning that kind of play the bass line and melody at the same time.. Welcome to Guitar Messenger! This section is a great example of using passing tones labeled PT in the tabs to connect chords in a riff or progression. With the exception of the first two chords Gmin to Ebmaj , this progression is very modal. The Counter Shift 1.

In this example, we learn to apply multi-finger tapping to a modal progression. This is the same progression that recurs throughout the song, but this time every chord is given a chance to stand out. The tapping in this section applies multi-finger tapping with the right hand, and pulling off to open strings with the left hand.

Those two techniques combined give the line a fairly large range of notes and also a large range of timbre, because tapping, picking, hammering on, pulling off, hammering on from an open string, pulling off to an open string, etc. What I really like about this line is that it applies those different techniques and sounds to a modal progression instead of your standard eight bars of A minor.

The Counter Shift 2. Having a diminished chord resolve up a half step is probably the most used progression in music, so harmonically nothing crazy is going on here. What I like about this riff is the chaotic use of the B whole-half diminished scale using open strings. On an 8-string guitar, with the exception of the open F and A strings, all of the open strings are in this scale I use the open A string in this riff anyway. Why not? So this riff was a perfect opportunity to go open-string crazy.

I like to use open strings because they have a cool timbre — six out of the twelve possible notes are incredibly easy to get to on an 8-string , and they allow guitarists to play lines and licks that would be impossible on most other instruments. Dispose Of Your Optimism 1. It sits right on top of the chorus, which is Bmin9addBmaj9-Bmin7b6. There are no sixths played in the first minor chord, so there is nothing that places it in either the Aeolian mode or Dorian Mode I consider Phrygian to be a separate type of sound, although technically it is minor and there are no elevenths played on the major chord so there is nothing defining it as Lydian or Ionian.

This is why I like the resolution so much on that last minor chord — it has that b6 in it and really gives off a heavy vibe. Dispose Of Your Optimism 2. Each half of the masterclass will include an exclusive new track for fans to download, along with tabs and performance notes for the examples in the Masterclass.

A trailer for the Masterlcass series can be viewed above. There is no doubt that Periphery are innovators, and they continue to raise the bar of originality upon the release of their much anticipated new Icarus Lives EP , which is now officially set for an April 19th release.

This offering features a brand new, previously unreleased track, a series of remixes and several video clips. We wanted to let you in on some exciting news! We like to think of it as a supplement to our first album. As you can tell, we tried to make this EP worth your time and money. We have put a ton of time into these songs to deliver to you an exciting and polished product. This five-week trek is going to be a monster as you can see below by viewing the entire touring itinerary.

The NYC-based collective is currently working on a full-length album scheduled to debut in early Along with jazz, Ever Forthright mixes elements of hip hop, DnB and pop into their djenty brew. The ferocious Terror Plots fuses elements of prog and modern metal with an aggressive political bent more often associated with the hardcore community. Practice the riffs leading into and out of the arpeggio slowly, and pay close attention to your muting technique to keep the switch clean.

Holographic Universe. For example, Amin7 goes like this. You just change the second and fourth notes, which are the 3rd and 7th of the chord, if you want a different kind of arpeggio, like Amaj7. You can also play one shape with your left hand and then change what you tap with your right hand, so you get different textures.

For example, for the Amin7 arpeggio I change what I do with my right hand, which makes it Amin7 9, Again, Per sounds all left-hand notes without picking by using hammer-ons and pull-offs. Prism And Gate Tapping. You can play it in minor, and because I play the root note with my right hand, I can switch that note out to play the 9th and still have the minor triad in my left hand.

As before, Per sounds all left-hand notes without picking by using hammer-ons and pull-offs. Pay attention to the slides that Per uses during and after the sweep, as they help him maintain the fluid sound of the lick, along with highlighting in separate octaves a pleasing perfect 4 th to major 3 rd resolution against the implied C major. Ghost Prototype Solo Lick. The bulk of this solo combines hybrid picking with groups of unpicked hammer-ons and pull-offs. To perform this at any tempo and make the notes actually sound will take a great deal of left-hand finger strength, which can be developed by isolating the first pattern from bar 3 and repeating it slowly, and then doing the same with the next two patterns.

Ascension Chamber Intro Solo. Pay attention to the abrupt transitions between palm-muted chugging and sliding during the riffs. Slaves to the Subliminal Verse Riffs. Make sure to let your strings ring out during the Pre-Chorus chords to make this section better stand out against the heavy portions before it, and prepare for the one unusual power chord voicing towards the end.

Slaves to the Subliminal Pre-Chorus. This is the simplest part of the Masterclass, but there is still more going on than first appears. Prepare your left hand positioning carefully and manage it during the subtle chord shifts, so that every note rings out through the full Chorus. Slaves to the Subliminal Chorus. The Illusionist Riffs.

The flurry of notes in the second-to-last bar is another place to spend some quality shed time. Per executes that series of arpeggios by hammering-on and pulling-off without a pick, leaving his right hand free to tap the descending highest note on the E string. One more thing — just like the riff beneath it, this solo is extremely tight and syncopated, and starts on the 8 th note before the beginning of the bar, so bear that in mind as you try to line yourself up with a metronome the original track.

The Illusionist Solo. His playing style quickly shifts from crushing extended-range riffing to elegantly-phrased solos that navigate the shifting sonic landscapes that he creates with his bandmates. But as you said, after Holographic Universe we went through the whole vocalist change, so we got stuck there for a while. This time around Jonas and I shared those duties. Since day one, the way we wrote songs was either Jonas or I came up with a basic song — the riffing, the basic drum patterns and some keyboard stuff, and then either me or Jonas or Christian made the vocal stuff on top of that.

For the latest album it was almost the same procedure — I came up with a few songs, Jonas came up with a few songs and then Jonas and I sat together with a microphone and did all of the vocal stuff together. So basically I came up with most of the clean stuff and he did the growling arrangements. So it was like: [sings melodic motif followed by gruff growls]. PN: We came up with really phony stuff.

Actually, we have got the whole album with our vocals on it. It sounds so fucking hilarious. Do you play and program those? How do you do that live? PN: Live we have all the keyboard parts on backing track. In the studio, we use all kinds of different keyboards. We use hardware keyboards and software synths.

PN: For the last album Jonas and I co-produced it, and then he mixed it. IC: Dark Tranquillity tours with those and have recorded with them as well, from what I understand. PN: People always used to ask what I used for the lead sound on those albums, because they thought it was a great lead sound. It was cheap, and you just plug and play. PN: For the latest album, I used software amps while recording it, but I recorded the direct signal, so later on we re-amped it.

We re-amped it, then we used an Ibanez Tube Screamer, a Rocktron [Egnater] tube head and a Marshall cabinet — we just put a microphone in front of it. IC: What all goes into your live rig — how does it differ from what you record with? PN: Yeah. As long as we have nice monitors it works fine, and it actually makes for a much cleaner sound onstage. PN: I play Ibanez guitars exclusively. PN: My dad was playing guitar when I was young. This sounds like rock music.

I picked up a lot of stuff from them, and Steve Vai of course. Then I started listening a lot to jazz fusion guys, mostly Holdsworth. He became my number one guitar player. What sort of things did you not agree on? IC: After several years of working together, why do you think there was a shift all of a sudden — especially after Holographic Universe came out and things were really looking up for you guys?

PN: We had problems working together since day one, I guess. Every album we did was a struggle. I guess you can see the situation from his side, too. IC: Once you let him go from the band, at what point did you decide that you wanted to have two vocalists this time around? PN: Some of the stuff he did is really hard to sing, and if you do it in the studio, you have hours and hours to make it happen, but live you have to do it night after night — keeping your voice in shape for 20 or 30 days in a row.

So we started looking for two guys right away. IC: Did those auditions come together quickly, or did it take you a while to find the right people? PN: It came together pretty quickly. Actually, we knew Roberth [Karlsson, extreme vocalist] from before.

We knew that he was a cool guy with an amazing voice, so he was our first choice. What has the reaction been like from your fans since then? This sucks. We basically had the choice of splitting the band up or going a new way. IC: How involved are you with the online scene — the forums and all that stuff?

Do you check it out? Sometimes I go online on different forums. IC: Scar Symmetry is your main gig right now, but do you have a day job when you go home, or are you able to do music full-time at this point? PN: No, actually I take care of my mama, because she is handicapped. We tracked the drums just two days before this tour. We brought our laptops and audio interfaces. IC: Maybe that explains how you guys are able to put out four albums within five years.

PN: Yeah, we write songs really fast. We start in two weeks. IC: Was that the point when you decided that you would be a professional musician? PN: Yeah, I guess so — when the first album came out and we started getting really positive reviews, and we got signed to Nuclear Blast. IC: Is there any advice you can give young guitarists and aspiring musicians out there to help them reach their goals? The third time you hit the chord, you change the high voicing of it by shifting the note on the 4 th string from the 4 th fret to the 5 th fret to create a bigger, airy sound [Dmin] — taking away the 9th and doubling the b3rd.

Then in measure 6 the first chord I introduced in Part 1 of the Masterclass comes back again, this time up a whole step as [Fmin7 9,11 ]. When the riff repeats after measure 8, it changes slightly. Sentient Glow Intro. This run starting in measure 3 is one of those things that just feels good.

Sentient Glow Verse. Sometimes I like to break out of a rut by trying a new tuning. I just got all of these ideas from it. It was really natural. Scarlet Main Riff. For the most part, the higher layer of the middle riff is the main riff played 12 frets up. Scarlet Main Riff Octave. Terra Firma Intro. Those chords in measure 4 are [D7] and [Amin]. Terra Firma Chorus. If you listen to Haunted Shores songs, we tend to use a combination of three or four different chord shapes pretty often.

I learned this first chord [Fmin7 9,11 ] a long time ago from my friend Nick Dodd , who used to sing in Haunted Shores. A lot of that is just chords that are bigger then they really need to be. The chord that he taught me really opened the door for me. That chord gets recycled a lot in Haunted Shores songs. You can build voicings off of that, just to add a little bit more specificity to a generic power chord.

One habit I developed when I was younger was using my thumb a lot. Bands like Extol are a huge influence of mine — the way they combine thrashier riffing with big open chords. The riff starts out with this big chord in measure 1 [Cmin add9 ] , and then goes to this one in measure 3 [Cmin add9,11 ]. That chord right there in measure 5 is the same one we went over earlier [Fmin7 9,11 ] , just picked differently. Immaterial Main Riff.

Passenger Main Riff. It just feels good to do. Passenger Verse Riff. Passenger Pre-Chorus Riff. It makes it a little bit thicker when you have the lower and the higher octave, as opposed to two guitars just doing the main riff:. Frak The Gods — Main Riff. This riff is the closing riff, but it also happens in the middle.

Those mutes are there in the middle. Frak The Gods — Breakdown. So the thought occurred to us: what if instead of us interviewing Marc, we had Misha do it instead? Soon, what began as an interview became an in-depth discussion between these two titans of modern progressive metal. In , the quartet released [id], their third full-length record and second through Sumerian Records.

Their blend of polyrhythmic grooves, complex harmonies and infectious melodies has earned them the respect of their peers and made a deep impact both within the metal community and beyond it. This is, what, round three for us? How are you feeling? MM: You have a very unique approach to the guitar. You have to fill the role of two guitarists in your band. How do you approach that? MO: I use effects. I use a harmonist to harmonize all of my riffs in key, and I use a loop station to record myself and play myself back.

I also write a lot of riffs using pedal tones, so I can have a moving bass line that accompanies the riff within the riff already, so it kind of covers a lot of ground. MM: What is your process for songwriting — is it something you do yourself? Is it something you do as a band, or in front of a computer or what?

MO: I do most of the writing by myself — a lot of it is in front of a computer. I like to sometimes write drum parts before I write the riffs, and then sometimes write riffs around that. A lot of times I get riffs stuck in my head, and the only way to really get them out is to apply them musically and record them. Where would you say you fit on that spectrum?

Pretty much the rest of the band, so far in our experience, has been chill with us doing it like that. No one really complains. How do you come up with those crazy rhythms? Because there are some pretty crazy rhythms in your music. As the guitarist, I need to hear that more than I need to hear myself.

MO: All I have through my monitor most of the time is kick drums, so that I can just follow that. MO: There are a few things. Another thing — a lot of people think that our bands get lots of girls. Have you ever gotten that before? You guys get girls. MM: We are the brown dudes. MM: That is the most sexual thing that has happened to us on tour.

It is definitely a different crowd. You have to be a certain kind of metal band. MM: It does kind of suck. I do have to agree. That is probably the only thing that makes home home for me. If we were single it might be a different story. MM: It does suck. Well hey, girls of GuitarMessenger. I hope I have time to record it. Actually, the shower — in the shower I always get riff ideas. I get ideas on walks or something.

Definitely nighttime, I get that, too. MM: I wish it was on walks. Yeah, I have no control over it. I always end up going to bed at like six am the nights I record a song. MM: You feel like a zombie. It sounds pretty terrible, and it kind of is, but at least you have a song out of it the next day, which is cool, I guess. MM: Marc, as I said, you have a really unique style. What has helped to develop that style? What are your influences? What would you say you draw from in the way that you play and write?

I grew up on Nirvana and Green Day and stuff like that, and I remember when I first heard weird time signatures — I just did not understand what was going on, and writing in weird time signatures was so foreign to me. MM: Where would you say you are now? MM: Dude, most depressingly good live band.

It really does sound better than the CD live. Do yourself a favor, listen to their albums — my favorite is Sound Awake. Brilliant album. That was totally necessary. Playing more technical or strange kinds of music brought us all together at one point. Have you run into a lot of egos or rockstars? Everyone can talk about Call Of Duty or something like that. Obviously Meshuggah had a huge impact on all of us and then we all grew listening to them, as well as listening to all the other forms of progressive music.

MM: And lots of non-metal music, which definitely makes its way through in very interesting ways. Bands in metal always seem to be so chill and so easygoing, and so easy to get along with. I think part of the reason, if I had to theorize, is that playing in a metal band is such a blow to your ego.

MO: And generally, people that listen to our style of music typically have to search for bands. Now in two seconds, you can check out…. Dream Theater! In some ways, maybe that makes it less of a connection, but in another way it makes all of these bands accessible. I think metal is really on the rise because of it.

It used to be a real subgenre, and now you find a lot of people are into metal. It was very mature, very well arranged and very well thought out. The riffs all have their logical place and everything flows, which is such an important thing to me — arrangements and how songs flow. I feel like a lot of bands nowadays tend to just jam really cool riffs together with no sense of purpose. This is a really good song.

I think we have a very similar sense of what sounds good. I think if you just continue in that direction and continue progressing and maturing in the way that you did between those two albums, your next album is going to be, like, perfect. MM: We have way too much material. We just wants lots of music out.

I just want to work on new, new stuff. Our fans also have extreme ADHD, like really, really bad. Would you agree with that sentiment with your last album? Yes, we are. I discovered a button on this. I know we were talking about the fans being ADD, but look!

This is about Boba Fett right now. What is it saying? Alright, and back to where we were…. I work so hard, and I know this guy works so hard to try to do something that sounds good and sounds like ourselves. Sure, if someone wants to know what you sound like in three words, then there you go. MM: Aggressive progressive music. Progressive aggressive, there you go. That even has some sort of rhyming scheme going there, so we can go with that.

We all started our bands before we knew each other, too. None of this was intentional. I think the fact that they got a good majority of the bands that are doing something new with it, people started labeling it as a subgenre. MM: I get blamed for this. MM: Yeah, where you play four notes on the power chord. I was looking for gear that was djenty. That is what it actually is. MM: It came out probably before a lot of you guys were born, before I was even born myself. That term is very limiting, because I feel like a lot of bands just focus on that open-note, syncopated sound.

I know that neither you nor our band does just that. You guys have expanded a lot on your sound. You were obviously put on this earth to play guitar and to write music. Everything else in life…. How about we make that a goal? Did you hear that? And just hopefully progress and be further up the ladder than we are now. It would be nice to do this for a living and not have to work a job when you get home. MM: No one in a metal band lives a very glamorous home life.

Thank you, forum and online people, for supporting us. MO: Even torrenters. To those who are going to torrent no matter what: first, please do buy the album if you like it. It would be nice to get a little bit of support there. They want their bands to survive. MM: So it actually does make a difference for us.

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