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Synopsis · Comboio Noturno Para Lisboa · Éjféli gyors Lisszabonba · Nachtzug nach Lissabon · Naktinis traukinys i Lisabona · Nocní vlak do Lisabonu · Noćni voz za. Download the movie using torrent in Bille August's adaptation of Pascal Mercier's Nachtzug nach Lissabon (Night Train to Lisbon) and the.

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mean constantly chasing after the torrent of available information. Rather, it means compiling a rough Nachtzug nach Lissabon. München/Wien: Carl Hanser. Night Train to Lisbon: Directed by Bille August. With Jeremy Irons, Mélanie Laurent, Jack Huston, Martina Gedeck. Swiss Professor Raimund Gregorius (Jeremy. entific equations of Longman, the torrent of language objectifies the Nachtzug nach Lissabon. Munich & Vienna: Carl Hanser, DOWNLOAD DJ TERBARU 2016 MP3 TORRENT Any - Defaults openvpn built into from "Zoombombing. 51 Fountain Pen Review Excel Magic performance on the computer, removing a wrong file inside usually cause serious problem for the web hosting Database Source Error solution have to manually delete some registries. Predictive calls that to that box, can sum up message that the.

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I didn't want to go back and go down another fork in the road, I wanted to go down all roads. I remember too when I was eighteen or nineteen, and a friend of a friend committed suicide, I was mad. How could she do that?

I could use another life, you know! So of course I loved this exploration of how a character can walk away from his life, how he can explore, through words and conversations, another life not just the present. There is a lot of wisdom in this book, and a lot of beautiful writing.

If I hadn't read To the Lighthouse this year, it would be hands-down the best book I read this year. As it is, I'm calling it a tie. Both are fabulous explorations of the inner life. View all 11 comments. When dictatorship is a fact, revolution is a duty. Normally, I would just leave it at that. It's a nice quote I hadn't heard before. But, in the current climate, I am concerned that I will have my account closed down by the GR censors if I don't explain myself more fully, so I guess I'd better do so.

I have not read the book, but we saw the movie at a local cinema, using the free gift card that I received as an unexpected bonus with my new contact lenses. Not thought it was great, but I was less When dictatorship is a fact, revolution is a duty. Not thought it was great, but I was less impressed; I had been told that the main character's changing perceptions of the Portugese language would play an important part in the story, and to my disappointment everyone spoke English thoughout. You could figure out from the context that they were presumably speaking Portugese or sometimes Swiss German, but all you actually heard was English.

Even though the acting and cinematography were excellent and the story was good, I felt cheated. But oh yes, I was forgetting, I need to justify myself. I am not, of course, comparing the very mild form of censorship that Goodreads has recently been practising with the horrors of the Salazar regime. That would be an absurd insult to all the brave people who resisted this appalling dictator, whose unashamedly Fascist government managed to cling to power until , four years after Salazar's death.

I would like to know more about how they succeeded in doing that. Presumably there were enough people on the inside supporting them, and they were sufficiently brutal about eliminating anyone on the outside who spoke up against them, that the large mass of citizens who just wanted to live quiet lives figured it was better to accept the status quo. It's terrible; even though I explicitly say that I'm not making this inappropriate comparison, it somehow sounds like I am. I don't know what to do here except to repeat, once more, that Goodreads management is not at all like a Fascist dictatorship.

Well, maybe just the tiniest, tiniest bit. In an abstract kind of way. One must admit that there are certain mechanisms in common, though the details of execution are of course completely different. I just can't get this to come out right. Probably the review is off-topic or something else that's now forbidden, but fear of having my account deleted is interfering with my powers of logical thought.

Otherwise, I'm sure I'd have done better. View all 44 comments. Raimund Gregorius is an expert in ancient languages Latin, Greek and Hebrew who teaches at a college in Bern, Switzerland. He invites the woman to attend his morning class - something completely out of character for this highly regimented man - but soon after she disappears. This strange start to his day gives rise to something of an epiphany for Raimund Raimund Gregorius is an expert in ancient languages Latin, Greek and Hebrew who teaches at a college in Bern, Switzerland.

This strange start to his day gives rise to something of an epiphany for Raimund who then also leaves the school, abandoning his class. Finding his way to an antiquarian bookstore he buys a book written in Portuguese, a language unfamiliar to him, written by a man named Amadeu de Prado. Securing himself in his own house and ignoring the ringing phone and the knocking at his door he begins to translate passages from the book using a language dictionary.

So begins this strangely beguiling tale. Once in Lisbon, Raimund decides to attempt to track down Prado, an act designed as much to justify this trip to himself as for any other reason. He uses the scant information contained in the book to help him begin to unpick the life of this man, moving around the city trying to find people associated with the writer. In quiet moments, he continues to browse passages from the book which, amongst other things, contain lines on loneliness, death, love and loyalty.

I also like detective stories and since arriving in Lisbon Gregorius has turned sleuth. As moves around the city picking up leads he meets a series of people each of whom offer up another small piece of the puzzle. I admit that I sometimes found this distracting and possibly the least satisfying element of the book even if a number of the postulations did cause me to pause and think, such as a brilliant observation on the subject of time and mortality.

Gregorius makes slow but steady progress. Sometimes he finds time to telephone his Greek friend, an eye doctor, back in Switzerland - the only person he feels comfortable sharing his thoughts with. So yes, this book has its flaws, and yet it held enough mystery and suspense to keep me hanging in there to see how it played out. View all 14 comments. On the other hand, this book made me want to write something to put my thoughts on it into some shape.

Incoherent Thought Number One The protagonist, a teacher of dead languages in Bern, is inspired by this book he comes across to quit his job and travel to Portugal to find out more about the writer of the book, Prado. Many reviewers who hated this novel have commented how utterly new-ageishly purile the comments in the book are, more like the thoughts of an emo-goth teen than the profound workings of the inner mind of brilliant doctor-cum-resistance-fighter.

That was one damn depressing book, but the whole notion on people caught up in words and text, and deeply delving into their innate isolation from everyone was a key theme too. That book too was a best seller in France. This intellectual navel-gazing seems to go down really well on the Continent. After all his inner mind gazing, after all his bravery at confronting difficult ideas and doing hard deeds, he finds himself feeling totally lost and empty.

His life, it turns out, has been a fraud. And yet, the protagonist is a teacher and lover of dead languages. If we take away language, what do we have? But just how are we supposed to react to this? The classic scenario is where you are standing next to a train switch lever and you see an oncoming train hurtling towards disaster. You can save the train full of hundreds of people by throwing the switch which will send it down another track.

But there is a fat man on the track and you are too far away to warn him to run. If you throw the lever, you kill the fat man. What do you do? Slightly different scenario. Same train, same hundreds of people, same hurtling towards disaster. Except that you are not next to the train switch lever, you are high above it on a beam and the fat man is next to you.

If you push the fat man, he is positioned just nicely so that he will fall on the lever and his weight will be heavy enough to cause it to move. The fat man will, unfortunately, die. Almost the same two outcomes in other words. Kill the fat man or kill the train passengers. Now this time, most people all say that they could not bring themselves to push the fat man over. Prado became a member of the Portuguese resistance because of an unfortunate incident he experienced. He was in his clinic when the police chief responsible for the deaths of thousands of Portuguese was brought in dying of heart attack.

If he failed to act promptly to save his life, the man would die. This earned him the hatred of his neighbours who argued that by saving him he condemned to death hundreds of other innocents. Later, as a member of the resistance, he is asked to kill a fellow resistance fighter whose identity has been betrayed. The woman, who he has fallen in love with, is a danger to the resistance because she holds in her photographic memory details of the entire resistance network.

Kill the woman or take the chance that he can hide her away safely for an indefinite period even though the risk to the resistance network was very high? What if, instead, he were the doctor who was asked to tend to her in prison where she was due to be tortured? Should he kill her or let her go on to spill the beans under torture? Incoherent Thought Number Five I guess all these notes are a little like the book itself.

A lot of questions, no real answers. As a story, I kinda liked it though. There were the people who read and the others. Whether you were a reader or a non-reader - it was soon apparent. There was no greater distinction between people. Gregorius is a philologist, a middle aged high school teacher of ancient languages in Bern, Switzerland.

He achieves this feat with only a dictionary and some language records, and later lessons in Lisbon, to help. He becomes curious about Prado and, once in Lisbon, decides to speak to those who knew him, to find out more about his life. He had a breakdown as a young man and clearly still suffers from depression. He also suffers from verbosity, pomposity and self-obsession.

Despite all of this, I found the story compelling. I knew nothing about this terrible period in Portuguese history. It only bears a passing resemblance to it. Quite a good movie but a lot of fabrication. The last 20 minutes or so is completely new. View all 7 comments. This book took me a long, long time to read, but I am glad I stuck with it.

A very philosophical book -- it asks the reader to imagine what would happen if you questioned everything about your life and started a new existence. The main character in this book does exactly that, using a book written by a Portuguese doctor to as a tool for self-discovery.

If you want to be prompted to think more deeply about life, who you truly are, and about human nature in general, read this book. View all 5 comments. My initial view of Night Train to Lisbon is that the reader is almost forced to follow the pattern of the novel's main character, Raimund Gregorius, attempting to explicate a book much like Raimund did when trying to comprehend the writings of a Portuguese doctor, Amadeu de Prado. How was it possible that a man who lived so very methodically could suddenly experience a mid-life or late-in-life crisis and take a plunge into the unknown like the one suggested by the earthy Kazantzakis character?

Later, it seemed to dawn on me that what Raimund continues to do after briefly meeting a Portuguese woman on a bridge, someone he never sees again, is not that far distant from what he has been doing for ages, mining old books written in classical languages for shreds of meaning. Prado's fate. Oddly perhaps, it is never quite clear what makes Raimund so passionate about his mission or what lessons he draws from his personal excavation of the man's life.

There is more than a little resemblance in Night Train to Paris to the work of Jose Saramago, Portuguese Nobel laureate, especially in his The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis and both Pascal Mercier, this book's author and Saramago seem to be influenced by Portugal's Fernando Pessoa, a writer who used what are termed heteronyms to give voice to competing artistic spirits.

It is less clear why Night Train to Lisbon seems so acclaimed in Europe but not nearly as well regarded in North America. Does this reflect a different pace of life in Europe vs. Still, there is very much to like about the story of a man who expresses that "given that we can only live a small part of what there is within us, what happens to the rest?

View all 6 comments. Why would you give me this book to read? At the time I was too pleased to have a present to care. A pen, a purl, a plum… But this? At the time, I thought it might still be a good story though. It looked to be a quiet, interior journey. Our man, Gregorius, has a thing for words.

I can relate. Gregorius is no Belle. Neither is he a Beast; there appears to be no life in him at all. I am endlessly accommodating. The title promised a night train to Lisbon. Can that be boring? Things are going to pick up. I know it. I tingled in anticipation. Gregorius finds the book. The book that will change the course of his life. The words stir his soul.

Well, not really. But he might simmer. He might simmer and eventually burn. But not yet. I can be patient. I am endlessly accommodating, endlessly patient. I have done harder things than read this book. How pleasant. Really this book should be right up my alley. No ordinary book, but a special, secret book. The words of this imaginary book are at times a balm to the reader, at times a mystery, and at times an echo of his own thoughts. But they move within the reader so deeply that the earth trembles.

You know I like that. But I feel cheated. The earth never trembles. Nothing does. All the excitement is of my own imagining. I want to like this book. So Marcus Aurelius outshines it. So what? Someone who has might, for that matter. Hmm… This is where the train derails for me. Not at the millionth typo along about page six, I think. I am also almost endlessly forgiving. I can forgive the editor for falling asleep at page two and doing absolutely no editing whatsoever.

I can accept that this boring, boring man walks away from his entire life, takes a Night — so much more romantic! I can accept that this book is written in a language he knows nothing of and that he learns it — Portuguese — practically overnight. All these things seem perfectly plausible to me. I can not accept that this man would do these things once the special, secret book is translated for me though. Gregorius is a scholar. Words are very much his thing. His only thing. He knows Marcus Aurelius.

He ought to know a little Portuguese. No way. Instead I find myself wondering how hard it is to get a job as a translator of airport novels. The woman writing a phone number on his forehead is a dominatrix. They share a felt-tipped pen fetish. He takes the wrong train and does not go to Lisbon after all.

This could have been a truly great book. Maybe it is in the original German. In English though? It has to be. There are pieces of it that made me doubt my frustration and want to start again, from the beginning. View all 12 comments. It's not bad, but I find that we are doing too much around this novel. The story starts well with this call to adventure, this woman on the bridge. But in fact, not much is happening; very quickly, the story is nothing more adventurous, lyrical and epic which I expected.

Instead, the story is philosophical, and I was a little bored. In short, this story, even if it is well written, is not my cup of tea: not enough adventure, epic, feelings or emotions. View 2 comments. A story like this only comes along once every few years and storytelling like this is just as rare.

I didn't want this book to end, which is very meta because it is a book about a lover of literature who falls in love with an out-of-print memoir from a kindred spirit. The protagonist, like me, dreads finishing his treasured book. There is so much nobility, intelligence, and heart in these characters that I am truly sad that I will never really know them in real life. I was almost honored to spen A story like this only comes along once every few years and storytelling like this is just as rare.

I was almost honored to spend time with them in this novel. What a brave and beautiful tale. I'm truly sad that it has come to an end. View all 3 comments. What a fabulous book. I know I will go back to this one to reread passages. To me this wasn't about philosophy. This was a book about how we live or don't live, about who we are and the myriad levels of identity we all have and how much we can ever really know or not know someone.

It's about flawed people finding some sort of salvation in their own humanity - or not being able to accept their flawed humanity. If you're looking for gripping clever plots with tight action, go dig up one of the endles What a fabulous book. If you're looking for gripping clever plots with tight action, go dig up one of the endless potboilers out there and head for the beach.

I read through this book, sometimes quickly, and sometimes slowly savoring the ideas behind it. This wasn't supposed to be brilliant philisophical treatise, it was the story of a man's life - a man who was both loved and adored and yet not really known at all, and how the various people who know us paint their own images onto us.

I also enjoyed how very much Lisbon was a character in the book as well to some degree as Bern and how much place can play a role in our lives and the impact of changing location no who we are and what we can do. The hype for this book over two million copies sold is inexplicable. Although the central character Gregorius is a classical linguist with a supposedly impregnable gift for recognizing and treasuring beautiful poetry, the entire story here hinges on his suddenly fleeing his life in pursuit of an elusive and patently insipid author named Amadeu Prado.

Prado's bathetic meditations fill the pages of this novel: a source of continual inspiration for Gregorius, these sections were a source of almos The hype for this book over two million copies sold is inexplicable. Prado's bathetic meditations fill the pages of this novel: a source of continual inspiration for Gregorius, these sections were a source of almost sickening agitation for me. Gregorius is so flatly rendered that at times he seems nothing more than a chalkboard on which the unoriginal thoughts of Prado are scratched.

In the process of searching for Prado, Gregorius becomes entangled with a cache of indistinguishable, hastily sketched characters who are themselves mouthpieces for Prado, whose chalky shadow ultimately adumbrates any redeeming light this book might enjoy. It's a philosophical novel about a language teacher, Raimund Gregorious, who is propelled by a combination of events on a quest to explore the life of Amadeu de Prado, a Portuguese physician and writer who was a member of the s political resistance against the Salazar dictatorship.

The story is told through excerpts from Prado's writings, alternating between that and details about Gregorious' experiences, incidents from Last night, I finished reading Night Train to Lisbon, by Pascal Mercier. The story is told through excerpts from Prado's writings, alternating between that and details about Gregorious' experiences, incidents from the life of Pardo, and from the lives of those who knew him.

All of which provide the context for an exploration of ideas about purpose, meaning, the nature of memory, and the effect memory exerts on understanding. For instance, Prado writes, "Of the thousands of experiences we have, we find language for one at most and even this one merely by chance and without the care it deserves. Buried under all the mute experiences are those unseen ones that give our life its form, its color, and its melody.

But the things we can't remember are still there, shaping our understanding of the present. That's the flavor of the book. I found it intriguing - six or seven story lines folding in on each other and the ideas that weave them together. And the quest to learn the details of someone else's story is something I readily identify with as a writer. I have several of those quests going right now, in fiction and non-fiction. The book suffers from significant problems. The English translation from the German is wooden; the book is too long; the editing is bad e.

The premise had promise, and some of the characters we The book suffers from significant problems. The premise had promise, and some of the characters were not without interest hence my two stars. Nevertheless, I recommend reading Pessoa's The Book of Disquiet for the philosophy, Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet for a novelistic exploration of the role of perspective in creating "truth," and listening to fado for an understanding of the Portuguese soul. Then there will be no need to be disappointed by the wreck of this night train to Lisbon.

View 1 comment. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There are introductory quotes by Michel Montaigne and Fernando Pessoa, both alluding the question of "self" and "the others" Basically, it's a story about a Swiss teacher,an erudite, of Greek and Latin, who saves a Portuguese woman when she's attempting suicide at a bridge over the Aare, in Bern, Switzerland.

So it starts. Raimund Gregorius is fascinated by the way she speaks French, with the Portuguese accent Yes, it's 4 a. A twenty six hours trip. He left school. Will send a letter to rector as an explanation. Someone had given him a Portuguese author book, by Amadeu de Prado,a medical doctor. It's a book like Marco Aurelio's reflections. It made the classical philologist buy some CD's to learn the language. He finds the Portuguese people "hasty" like the French, and the sound of the language like a "piccola" flute.

But what about the Portuguese woman he saved near the bridge? After the bridge episode, he invited her to his classes Also his appreciation for the Greek,with no vanity. So, his languages skills help him to easily decipher the Portuguese book he carried along: Prado's book. He remembers his failed marriage,though wife was once a passionate student of his classes.

In Lisbon,many things start happening, some even making Raimund to ponder a home come back. He falls and gets his glasses broken; gets new ones: hard to adapt to this new look. His father, a stern man and a judge loyal to the government, later crumbles under the pressure of his conscience and commits suicide. Amadeu, who is by now an accomplished and well-liked doctor, saves the life of Mendez, the "Butcher of Lisbon" and Chief of Secret Police. In the public eye, Amadeu's actions mark him down as a traitor, resulting in him being shunned and secretly joining the resistance to ease his conscience.

After his premature death due to an aneurysm , Amadeu's notes and journal entries are edited and published by his sister Adriana. She owes her life to Amadeu and religiously devotes her energy to preserving her brother's legacy. She prescribes him new glasses when he breaks his old ones in an accident.

Raimund visits him several times to talk about Amadeu. She later fled the country and became a professor of history at the University of Salamanca. The dictatorship lasted until and relied heavily upon a brutal secret police force, the PIDE. Salazar died in , two years after handing over power to Marcello Caetano who continued his policies until when the Carnation Revolution overthrew the regime.

The story ends with Raimund returning to Bern. Raimund, who has been suffering from spells of dizziness for a while now, submits himself to a physical exam. Night Train to Lisbon spends considerable time contemplating ideas, exploring on one hand Gregorious' contemplation of self and the other de Prado's journal and philosophies.

Mercier uses various activities and subthemes to help explore these deep, self-reflective subjects including "night journeys, insomnia and dream-filled sleep, of being stuck in place yet somehow adrift, and confusion about life's purpose. Like the depiction of the city of Lisbon as mysterious and intricate, the text of Night Train to Lisbon is intricate and complicated, sometimes withholding information from the reader. Iranian writer Mahshid Mirmoezzi translated the book into Persian, with its release in April Danish film director Bille August 's film adaptation of the same name , with Jeremy Irons as Raimund Gregorius, was released in During the Sunflower Student Movement in Taiwan on 21 March , the wall of the second floor of the Legislative Yuan was sprayed with a quote from the work, "when dictatorship is a fact, revolution becomes a duty.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the novel. For the film adaptation, see Night Train to Lisbon film. The Kansas City Star. Irish Times. Herald Sun. Melbourne, Australia. Telegraph UK. Retrieved 10 March The News-Gazette. Champaign-Urbana, IL.

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Ich habe nun verschiedene Artikel gelesen und jetzt freue ich mich richtig auf diesen kleinen Mini Erlebnis Urlaub. Klasse Bericht. Ich plane die Reise im September. Hab schon vieles vorbereitet. Finde fast alles in Deinem Bericht wieder. Hast Du hiermit Erfahrung? Gare Nord nach Gare Montparnasse mit Metro 4. Den Nachtzug hatte ich per Sitzplatz geplant? Hast Du hier Erfahrung?

Da bleibt dann wirklich nur der Nachtzug nach Lissabon. Gute Reise! Finde ich bequemer. Das wird meine vierte Zugreise mit dem Surexpreso. Hat jemand Erfahrung damit, wann ich mit dem Verkauf rechnen kann? Oder ist es besser z. Warte einmal ab. Hallo, vielleicht zur Info. Hatte gerade am Freitag noch Kontakt mit Gleisnost und die meinten, das diese Fahrt immer nur sehr kurzfristig buchbar sind, ich sollte mir deshalb keine Gedanken machen. VG Friedhelm. Wer ist in diesem Sommer gefahren? Hallo Helga.

Hoffe die INFo hilft Dir weiter. Danke, Friedhelm. Wenn alles klappt bin ich ca. Allen anderen Zugreisenden ebenfalls viel Spass. Das klingt richtig gut und wir wollen das auch machen! Super toll beschrieben. U-Bahnstation Gare Montparnasse ist riesig, man muss viel laufen, um zu den Abfahrtsgleisen zu kommen.

Es war ein tolles Erlebnis nach der langen Fahrt morgens in Lissabon St. Appolonia anzukommen. Paris wurde mit 15 min. Nach 26 Stunden wieder nachts in Frankfurt angekommen. Lese Deine Reiseberichte gerne. Eine Frage hab ich. Meine Kinder sind 2 und 3. Klar mit Stops in Paris und ggf Irun. Vielleicht hast du ja ein paar Tips..

Lg Jennifer. Aber Ihr wisst ja bestimmt, wie Eure Kinder auf Bahnreisen bisher so reagiert haben. Bin selbst nach Rom und letztes Jahr nach Portugal gefahren, und habe immer wieder Familien mit Kindern angetroffen, Es gibt im Trenhotel — Nachtzug nach Lissabon — 4-Bett Abteile und man kann sicher als Familie gut reisen.

In Irun steht der Nachtzug auf dem Nachbargleis. Mein Kind ist 2 Jahre alt und ich bin gespannt, wie die Fahrt vor allem im Schlafwagen wird. Ich werde im Anschluss berichten, wie es mit Kleinkind ist. Heuer wird es wegen Corona wohl eher nichts werden. Wie gesagt, alles was ich hier schreibe bezieht sich immer auf den Gesichtspunkt der Mitnahme eines nicht zerlegten Fahrrades in Frankreich: velo non-demontee.

In Frankreich scheint sich das Angebot der Mitnahme eines nicht demontierten Fahrrades wieder ein wenig zu verbessern. Von dort aus ca. TER in ca. Fahrzeit unter 6 Stunden. Die Variante via Strasbourg nach Bordeaux bzw. Hendaye zu kommen erspart ggf. In der Metro kann man wohl auch kein Fahrrad transportieren.

In einem Forum habe ich entsprechende Bilder gesehen. Und, sind die Bauarbeiten zwischen Salamanca und Vilar del Formosa inzwischen abgeschlossen? Das ist nicht weit von Biaritz, Irun oder San Sebastian. Inhalt: Nachtzug Hendeye bzw. Im Grenzbahnhof Irun begann bis zum 2. Quartal die Reise im Hotelzug durch Spanien und Portugal.

Badezimmer mit Dusche und WC…. Kurz nach dem Start des Nachtzugs nach Lissabon…. Gegessen wird an der Bar. Der Bahnhof Lissabon Oriente…. Facebook Twitter Pinterest Drucken Email mal geteilt. Kommentare Interessant beschrieben, Gerhard! Danke sehr! You can save the train full of hundreds of people by throwing the switch which will send it down another track. But there is a fat man on the track and you are too far away to warn him to run. If you throw the lever, you kill the fat man.

What do you do? Slightly different scenario. Same train, same hundreds of people, same hurtling towards disaster. Except that you are not next to the train switch lever, you are high above it on a beam and the fat man is next to you. If you push the fat man, he is positioned just nicely so that he will fall on the lever and his weight will be heavy enough to cause it to move. The fat man will, unfortunately, die. Almost the same two outcomes in other words.

Kill the fat man or kill the train passengers. Now this time, most people all say that they could not bring themselves to push the fat man over. Prado became a member of the Portuguese resistance because of an unfortunate incident he experienced. He was in his clinic when the police chief responsible for the deaths of thousands of Portuguese was brought in dying of heart attack.

If he failed to act promptly to save his life, the man would die. This earned him the hatred of his neighbours who argued that by saving him he condemned to death hundreds of other innocents. Later, as a member of the resistance, he is asked to kill a fellow resistance fighter whose identity has been betrayed.

The woman, who he has fallen in love with, is a danger to the resistance because she holds in her photographic memory details of the entire resistance network. Kill the woman or take the chance that he can hide her away safely for an indefinite period even though the risk to the resistance network was very high? What if, instead, he were the doctor who was asked to tend to her in prison where she was due to be tortured? Should he kill her or let her go on to spill the beans under torture?

Incoherent Thought Number Five I guess all these notes are a little like the book itself. A lot of questions, no real answers. As a story, I kinda liked it though. There were the people who read and the others. Whether you were a reader or a non-reader - it was soon apparent.

There was no greater distinction between people. Gregorius is a philologist, a middle aged high school teacher of ancient languages in Bern, Switzerland. He achieves this feat with only a dictionary and some language records, and later lessons in Lisbon, to help. He becomes curious about Prado and, once in Lisbon, decides to speak to those who knew him, to find out more about his life.

He had a breakdown as a young man and clearly still suffers from depression. He also suffers from verbosity, pomposity and self-obsession. Despite all of this, I found the story compelling. I knew nothing about this terrible period in Portuguese history. It only bears a passing resemblance to it. Quite a good movie but a lot of fabrication. The last 20 minutes or so is completely new. View all 7 comments. This book took me a long, long time to read, but I am glad I stuck with it.

A very philosophical book -- it asks the reader to imagine what would happen if you questioned everything about your life and started a new existence. The main character in this book does exactly that, using a book written by a Portuguese doctor to as a tool for self-discovery. If you want to be prompted to think more deeply about life, who you truly are, and about human nature in general, read this book. View all 5 comments.

My initial view of Night Train to Lisbon is that the reader is almost forced to follow the pattern of the novel's main character, Raimund Gregorius, attempting to explicate a book much like Raimund did when trying to comprehend the writings of a Portuguese doctor, Amadeu de Prado. How was it possible that a man who lived so very methodically could suddenly experience a mid-life or late-in-life crisis and take a plunge into the unknown like the one suggested by the earthy Kazantzakis character?

Later, it seemed to dawn on me that what Raimund continues to do after briefly meeting a Portuguese woman on a bridge, someone he never sees again, is not that far distant from what he has been doing for ages, mining old books written in classical languages for shreds of meaning. Prado's fate. Oddly perhaps, it is never quite clear what makes Raimund so passionate about his mission or what lessons he draws from his personal excavation of the man's life. There is more than a little resemblance in Night Train to Paris to the work of Jose Saramago, Portuguese Nobel laureate, especially in his The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis and both Pascal Mercier, this book's author and Saramago seem to be influenced by Portugal's Fernando Pessoa, a writer who used what are termed heteronyms to give voice to competing artistic spirits.

It is less clear why Night Train to Lisbon seems so acclaimed in Europe but not nearly as well regarded in North America. Does this reflect a different pace of life in Europe vs. Still, there is very much to like about the story of a man who expresses that "given that we can only live a small part of what there is within us, what happens to the rest? View all 6 comments. Why would you give me this book to read?

At the time I was too pleased to have a present to care. A pen, a purl, a plum… But this? At the time, I thought it might still be a good story though. It looked to be a quiet, interior journey. Our man, Gregorius, has a thing for words. I can relate. Gregorius is no Belle. Neither is he a Beast; there appears to be no life in him at all. I am endlessly accommodating. The title promised a night train to Lisbon. Can that be boring? Things are going to pick up. I know it. I tingled in anticipation.

Gregorius finds the book. The book that will change the course of his life. The words stir his soul. Well, not really. But he might simmer. He might simmer and eventually burn. But not yet. I can be patient.

I am endlessly accommodating, endlessly patient. I have done harder things than read this book. How pleasant. Really this book should be right up my alley. No ordinary book, but a special, secret book. The words of this imaginary book are at times a balm to the reader, at times a mystery, and at times an echo of his own thoughts. But they move within the reader so deeply that the earth trembles. You know I like that.

But I feel cheated. The earth never trembles. Nothing does. All the excitement is of my own imagining. I want to like this book. So Marcus Aurelius outshines it. So what? Someone who has might, for that matter. Hmm… This is where the train derails for me. Not at the millionth typo along about page six, I think. I am also almost endlessly forgiving. I can forgive the editor for falling asleep at page two and doing absolutely no editing whatsoever. I can accept that this boring, boring man walks away from his entire life, takes a Night — so much more romantic!

I can accept that this book is written in a language he knows nothing of and that he learns it — Portuguese — practically overnight. All these things seem perfectly plausible to me. I can not accept that this man would do these things once the special, secret book is translated for me though. Gregorius is a scholar. Words are very much his thing. His only thing. He knows Marcus Aurelius.

He ought to know a little Portuguese. No way. Instead I find myself wondering how hard it is to get a job as a translator of airport novels. The woman writing a phone number on his forehead is a dominatrix. They share a felt-tipped pen fetish. He takes the wrong train and does not go to Lisbon after all. This could have been a truly great book. Maybe it is in the original German. In English though? It has to be. There are pieces of it that made me doubt my frustration and want to start again, from the beginning.

View all 12 comments. It's not bad, but I find that we are doing too much around this novel. The story starts well with this call to adventure, this woman on the bridge. But in fact, not much is happening; very quickly, the story is nothing more adventurous, lyrical and epic which I expected. Instead, the story is philosophical, and I was a little bored. In short, this story, even if it is well written, is not my cup of tea: not enough adventure, epic, feelings or emotions.

View 2 comments. A story like this only comes along once every few years and storytelling like this is just as rare. I didn't want this book to end, which is very meta because it is a book about a lover of literature who falls in love with an out-of-print memoir from a kindred spirit. The protagonist, like me, dreads finishing his treasured book. There is so much nobility, intelligence, and heart in these characters that I am truly sad that I will never really know them in real life.

I was almost honored to spen A story like this only comes along once every few years and storytelling like this is just as rare. I was almost honored to spend time with them in this novel. What a brave and beautiful tale. I'm truly sad that it has come to an end. View all 3 comments. What a fabulous book. I know I will go back to this one to reread passages. To me this wasn't about philosophy.

This was a book about how we live or don't live, about who we are and the myriad levels of identity we all have and how much we can ever really know or not know someone. It's about flawed people finding some sort of salvation in their own humanity - or not being able to accept their flawed humanity. If you're looking for gripping clever plots with tight action, go dig up one of the endles What a fabulous book.

If you're looking for gripping clever plots with tight action, go dig up one of the endless potboilers out there and head for the beach. I read through this book, sometimes quickly, and sometimes slowly savoring the ideas behind it. This wasn't supposed to be brilliant philisophical treatise, it was the story of a man's life - a man who was both loved and adored and yet not really known at all, and how the various people who know us paint their own images onto us.

I also enjoyed how very much Lisbon was a character in the book as well to some degree as Bern and how much place can play a role in our lives and the impact of changing location no who we are and what we can do. The hype for this book over two million copies sold is inexplicable. Although the central character Gregorius is a classical linguist with a supposedly impregnable gift for recognizing and treasuring beautiful poetry, the entire story here hinges on his suddenly fleeing his life in pursuit of an elusive and patently insipid author named Amadeu Prado.

Prado's bathetic meditations fill the pages of this novel: a source of continual inspiration for Gregorius, these sections were a source of almos The hype for this book over two million copies sold is inexplicable. Prado's bathetic meditations fill the pages of this novel: a source of continual inspiration for Gregorius, these sections were a source of almost sickening agitation for me.

Gregorius is so flatly rendered that at times he seems nothing more than a chalkboard on which the unoriginal thoughts of Prado are scratched. In the process of searching for Prado, Gregorius becomes entangled with a cache of indistinguishable, hastily sketched characters who are themselves mouthpieces for Prado, whose chalky shadow ultimately adumbrates any redeeming light this book might enjoy.

It's a philosophical novel about a language teacher, Raimund Gregorious, who is propelled by a combination of events on a quest to explore the life of Amadeu de Prado, a Portuguese physician and writer who was a member of the s political resistance against the Salazar dictatorship. The story is told through excerpts from Prado's writings, alternating between that and details about Gregorious' experiences, incidents from Last night, I finished reading Night Train to Lisbon, by Pascal Mercier.

The story is told through excerpts from Prado's writings, alternating between that and details about Gregorious' experiences, incidents from the life of Pardo, and from the lives of those who knew him. All of which provide the context for an exploration of ideas about purpose, meaning, the nature of memory, and the effect memory exerts on understanding. For instance, Prado writes, "Of the thousands of experiences we have, we find language for one at most and even this one merely by chance and without the care it deserves.

Buried under all the mute experiences are those unseen ones that give our life its form, its color, and its melody. But the things we can't remember are still there, shaping our understanding of the present. That's the flavor of the book. I found it intriguing - six or seven story lines folding in on each other and the ideas that weave them together.

And the quest to learn the details of someone else's story is something I readily identify with as a writer. I have several of those quests going right now, in fiction and non-fiction. The book suffers from significant problems. The English translation from the German is wooden; the book is too long; the editing is bad e. The premise had promise, and some of the characters we The book suffers from significant problems. The premise had promise, and some of the characters were not without interest hence my two stars.

Nevertheless, I recommend reading Pessoa's The Book of Disquiet for the philosophy, Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet for a novelistic exploration of the role of perspective in creating "truth," and listening to fado for an understanding of the Portuguese soul.

Then there will be no need to be disappointed by the wreck of this night train to Lisbon. View 1 comment. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There are introductory quotes by Michel Montaigne and Fernando Pessoa, both alluding the question of "self" and "the others" Basically, it's a story about a Swiss teacher,an erudite, of Greek and Latin, who saves a Portuguese woman when she's attempting suicide at a bridge over the Aare, in Bern, Switzerland.

So it starts. Raimund Gregorius is fascinated by the way she speaks French, with the Portuguese accent Yes, it's 4 a. A twenty six hours trip. He left school. Will send a letter to rector as an explanation. Someone had given him a Portuguese author book, by Amadeu de Prado,a medical doctor. It's a book like Marco Aurelio's reflections.

It made the classical philologist buy some CD's to learn the language. He finds the Portuguese people "hasty" like the French, and the sound of the language like a "piccola" flute. But what about the Portuguese woman he saved near the bridge? After the bridge episode, he invited her to his classes Also his appreciation for the Greek,with no vanity.

So, his languages skills help him to easily decipher the Portuguese book he carried along: Prado's book. He remembers his failed marriage,though wife was once a passionate student of his classes. In Lisbon,many things start happening, some even making Raimund to ponder a home come back. He falls and gets his glasses broken; gets new ones: hard to adapt to this new look. The "new vision" is, yet, almost miraculous.

He even starts thinking about himself, while reading Prado's self-analysis. Prado thought that he was not "arrogant", but he considered that: that was the way people saw him. So, Raimund goes through a similar process of self-mirroring, self-reconsideration. Raimund buys new clothes, Salazar Book That's the pleasant part of the city. In a Rossio book store he finds a photo-biography of the dictator Salazar.

That's his view of a photo of the Portuguese politician: "black dressed, with a domineering face though not insensible, with a hard look,even fanatical, yet revealing intelligence". So his hands got deformed After this rendez-vous with History He bought also a map of the city. It's been six days since the Swiss philologist left Bern; and that day he felt a craving for the old texts, he misses them Ten days have elapsed since Raimund left Bern.

Raimund, the Papirus, as some mockingly called him at school, got access to the seventeen year old farewell speech of Amadeu. Yes, farewell day, Amadeu read it for school members gathered…and he asked for forgiveness at the end; nobody reacted…but a howling dog…and then laughter ensued, recalled the priest. What a speech…Raimund is amazed; that day after meeting with the priest, the philologist had to visit, again, the school Amadeu frequented; now in ruins; and among the ruins, Raimund will read for three times the speech.

That day too, the dead-languages lover, had ordered in a book store two books: one on Persian language and one on Portuguese. The employee had laughed, but Raimund thought: now both languages are equal. Raimund bought a chess board. At the hotel he used to play till late; he even tried variations of the Alekhine match with Bolgoljubow. Raimund tried calling the phone number the Portuguese woman gave him in Switzerland…but gave up.

A lot of pages dedicated to his personality description. He was an audacious adventurer; some loved him, some hated him, though. He recalled, when incarcerated, Amadeu used to bring him remedies and books. Once a priest aspirer, Amadeu became materialist… a medical doctor fascinated by the brain. And they play chess. Then he returns to Bern. Gregorius will play chess again with Greek friend Doxiades.

Don't look after Prado's book: it's a fiction too. I noticed that this book evokes very different reactions, from admiration to disgust, and oddly enough, this is also one of the themes of the book: how different the perception of people can be, especially about each other; close friends, partners, even very close family can see or feel each other fundamentally 'wrong'. Pascal Mercier pseudonym of Swiss philosopher Peter Bieri has written a philosophical book, but packaged as an exciting story in a concrete setting, in the line of Voltaire's Ca I noticed that this book evokes very different reactions, from admiration to disgust, and oddly enough, this is also one of the themes of the book: how different the perception of people can be, especially about each other; close friends, partners, even very close family can see or feel each other fundamentally 'wrong'.

Pascal Mercier pseudonym of Swiss philosopher Peter Bieri has written a philosophical book, but packaged as an exciting story in a concrete setting, in the line of Voltaire's Candide and Eco's The Name of the Rose. That setting, - Lisbon, the Portuguese language and Portuguese history especially that of the Salazar dictatorship, -, offers a particularly charming and interesting framework for what is actually a quest: the quest of the dull teacher of classic languages Raimund - Mundus - Gregorius nice nod, that first name for someone who by the standards of our time is truly otherworldly for the Portuguese doctor Amadeus de Prado, from whom he has found an intriguing little book full of life wisdom.

That quest brings him to Lisbon and gradually also to relatives and friends of de Prado, who has now been dead for 30 years. They all seem to have known a piece of his life and to have a very fragmentary picture of who he actually was; in his booklet de Prado constantly wonders what the relationship is between the inner and the outer, between the own image and that of the others.

Along with excerpts from the book, we gradually gain a more complete picture or so we think of Amadeus de Prado, as a complex, but impressive personality who struggled with many fundamental questions and certainly at two moments in his life had to make a nearly impossible moral choice: when he was confronted as a doctor with the "executioner of Lisbon" and when the resistance against Salazar wanted to eliminate one of its own members because of a security threat.

Here the author presents us with a second philosophical theme, that of making decisive choices, of choosing between impossible options. Mercier or better Bieri clearly distances himself from the stoicism of Montaigne, the French 16th century writer, from whom is also included a motto at the beginning of the book. In this book the message is: everyone must take charge of his own life, by making choices and daring to live with the consequences; disappointment or failure are not a shame, but actually make life fully livable; and in a sense so does death: death alone gives meaning and beauty to life, and also to the darker side of it.

I now also saw the movie version Night Train to Lisbon, with a brilliant Jeremy Irons , and although that does not have the philosophical depth of the book, as a story it is managed much better. This is a book which can be read on different levels! At least for me.

I can think about a paragraph and the import of those lines OR I can read it for the story from start to finish. Some lines are priceless. Some lines, I just think: What??!!! I am nearing the end! What is going to happen? It ends perfectly. This book is very philosophical! Definitely not for everyone, and it is kind of wordy, but boy is there a lot to think about Some reviewers remark that it is poorly translated from the Ge This is a book which can be read on different levels!

Some reviewers remark that it is poorly translated from the German, the author being Swiss, but I think the lines flow beautifully. There are lines in French which are not translated but the Portuguese is! I bet that those who know Portuguese will delight in those lines. Well, because words have a poetry to them. That is one of the many themes of this book. You remove one word and all the others change their meaning.

In this respect, the audiobook format is the one to choose. Sean Barrett does a fine job of narrating the audiobook. An audiobook filled with foreign names, as this one is, is a bit daunting. Perhaps a paper book is easier to follow.

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